Project: New Cinephilia

Damon and Kate introduce the day

This past summer saw the debut of Project: New Cinephilia, a day-long symposium at the Edinburgh International Film Festival preceded by essays, online discussions 1+2sound, video and artwork, as well as a hefty library of cinephilia resources on this website and discussion on the forums of MUBI.

You can find coverage of the symposium from Jeff Reichert at Sundance Now and Michael Koresky at Criterion, as well as a PDF of the PNC Programme Notes here.

As we consider where the project may lead, we’d like to thank everyone who took part as writers, readers, speakers, audience members and forum commenters. If you would like to get in touch you can find our contact details here or follow us on @ProjectNC.

Cinephilia and Comics

B-Movie Filmish Image. © Edward Ross, 2011By Edward Ross

Cinema is a medium tied to temporality.  We experience a film one frame at a time, and barring a projector meltdown or remote control mishap, we watch it from start to finish in the order designed by the film’s creators.  Comics, on the other hand, are a profoundly spacial medium.  Time is read between the lines and between the panels, but it is the space of the page that we primarily consume.  Over a two-page spread, all moments are one, and page-time is traveled as the eye darts back and forth across the page. Continue reading

About Refractive Cinema: When Films Interrogate Films

By Timothy Corrigan

The following is an excerpt from Timothy Corrigan’s book The Essay Film: From Montaigne, After Marker, forthcoming from Oxford University Press in August 2011. It is published here by permission.

Art about art-or better put, art through art–is a tradition as long as artistic and literary history itself, extending back through many centuries of literature and visual representation and forward into film history, from well before John Keats’s ode on an urn to well after Buster Keaton’s comedies about a film projectionist and cameraman.[i] Like its forerunners, film’s versions of this reflexivity both create and participate in their own aesthetic principles, overlapping their representations of other artistic and aesthetic experiences with their own cinematic processes and frequently reflecting those processes as a reflection on film itself. Continue reading

Cinephilia, love and being caught off-guard

Wind From The East (Groupe Dziga Vertov) 1970 Italy/France/West Germany 100 min

From: Genevieve Yue

To pick up on Daniel’s question, what is the birdie that we cinephiles swat around? Or as André Bazin put it more bluntly, what is cinema? It’s interesting to me how this question continually crops up long after the medium’s many deaths, from the various proclamations of critics and filmmakers throughout the twentieth century to the now-undisputed technological end of celluloid (first heralded by television, video, and finally, the digital turn). If anything, the end of the cinematic century has only opened new questions as to what cinema was, or continues to be in augmented forms. For historians of early cinema, these lines of inquiry have been particularly fertile: in an era of multiple viewing platforms, for example, how might we reconsider the history of cinema as that of a screen practice, as Anne Friedberg and Charles Musser have done? And when we look at the long history of the medium, what might we anticipate for its future? Continue reading

On advocacy and anticipation

The Soft Skin (François Truffaut) 1964 France/Potugal 113 min

From Melissa Anderson:

A few years ago, a French friend, in introducing me to a new word, helpfully elucidated the distinction between two terms: cinéphile versus cinéphage—a lover of movies versus someone who consumes them voraciously and indiscriminately. Terence Davies recalls such an insatiable appetite in Of Time and the City, his exquisite 2008 documentary about Liverpool, his hometown: “At age seven, I saw Gene Kelly in Singin’ in the Rain. I discovered movies and swallowed them whole.”

This kind of gluttony, it seems to me, is a necessary first step to being a film critic: devouring cinema (and being devoured by it), sampling and discovering as much as you can. But eventually you realize that it’s impossible to ingest—or love—it all; after a period of prolonged bingeing, you should know what you really crave and what satisfies you. Continue reading

Tastemakers or taste-testers?

From: Michael Koresky

Thanks so much, Kent. Daniel, I’d obviously like for you specifically to keep in mind Kent’s closing words regarding filmmaking and its critical appreciation existing on what seem like two different planets. Considering you’ve played both sides of that fence, you seem well positioned to talk about this….especially considering that you refuse to play both sides of that fence….your critical writing is not about evaluation per se, but rather, like your feature You Are Here, it’s about searching for a way to describe a form. Or at least it seems to me. Continue reading

“Hi, I’m Al, I’m an Althusserian Marxist …”

Louis Althusser

Feedback Loop 1: The Academia Question

Each post on the Project: New Cinephilia is linked at the bottom of the page to a topic on the MUBI Forum.  You’ll find P:NC discussions grouped here and one that managed to get away here.  In Feedback Loop we’ll be pointing to some of the forum debate and first up its the burning issue of academia. Continue reading